What is Pancreatic Cancer?
477
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-477,single-format-standard,bridge-core-2.6.1,qode-page-transition-enabled,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,footer_responsive_adv,qode-theme-ver-24.6,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.5.0,vc_responsive

What is Pancreatic Cancer?

What is Pancreatic Cancer?

Dr. Navneet Sharda provides this information as an educational source. It is not intended as a substitute for a consultation with a qualified healthcare provider.

The most common is cancer of the exocrine pancreas (which we will call pancreatic cancer), originates in the pancreatic ducts . The ducts are responsible for carrying pancreatic juice to the intestines. This type of pancreatic cancer, called pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

 

PANCREATIC CANCER SYMPTOMS
According to Cancer Care Specialist Dr. Nav Sharda of Cancer Care and Treatment Center, Las Vegas, “Most people with pancreatic cancer have pain, weight loss, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin)”.

  • Pain is common. It usually develops in the upper abdomen as a dull ache that wraps around to the back. The pain can come and go, and it might get worse after eating.
  • Weight loss. Some people lose weight because of a lack of appetite, feeling full after eating only a small amount of food, or diarrhea. The bowel movements might look greasy and float in the toilet bowl because they contain undigested fat.
  • Jaundice causes yellow colored skin and whites of the eyes. Bowel movements may not be a normal brown color, and instead have a grayish appearance.

 

PANCREATIC CANCER SCREENING

If you develop signs of pancreatic cancer, your doctor or nurse will order one or more tests. This might include blood tests and imaging tests, like an ultrasound or CT scan. These tests can show if there is a mass (a growth) in the pancreas and if surgery to remove the mass is possible.

Biopsy — In some cases, your doctor will recommend a biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of cancer. A biopsy is a test that removes a small piece of tissue from the mass. A physician examines the tissue under a microscope to see if there are signs of cancer.
To perform the biopsy, a doctor will use a CT scan or ultrasound to pinpoint the mass, then insert a needle into the mass and take a sample of tissue.

 

PANCREATIC CANCER STAGING
According to Cancer Care Specialist Dr. Nav Sharda of Cancer Care and Treatment Center, Las Vegas, Once pancreatic cancer is diagnosed, the next step is to determine its stage. Staging is a system used to describe the aggressiveness and spread of a cancer. A pancreatic cancer’s stage is based on:

  • How the cancer looks under the microscope.
  • If there are signs of cancer spread outside the pancreas on a physical exam, CT scan or MRI, chest x-ray, or other imaging tests.

 

The final staging of a pancreatic cancer often depends on what is found during surgery.
Pancreatic cancer stages range from stage I, the earliest stage, to stage IV, which means that the cancer has spread to distant organs, such as the brain. In general, lower stage cancers are less aggressive and require less treatment than do higher stage cancers.

 

PANCREATIC CANCER TREATMENT
Pancreatic cancer can be treated with several approaches. Early stage pancreatic cancer can often be treated and even cured with surgery. After surgery, further treatment, called adjuvant therapy, is often recommended. This might include chemotherapy or radiation therapy. In other cases, chemotherapy or radiation might be offered before surgery (termed neoadjuvant therapy).

However, surgery is often not possible; pancreatic cancer is often advanced by the time it is diagnosed. If surgery is not possible, radiation therapy chemotherapy, or both are often used to shrink the cancer, reduce symptoms, and prolong life.

Laparoscopy — In some centers, laparoscopy is recommended before surgery to get more information about the location and size of the cancer. During a laparoscopy, the surgeon inserts a thin tube with a camera into small incisions in the belly to see the organs inside the abdomen.

Surgery for tumors in the head of the pancreas — The standard operation for tumors in the head of the pancreas  is a Whipple procedure (also called a pancreaticoduodenectomy) .
In this procedure, the surgeon removes the pancreatic head, the duodenum (first part of the small intestine), part of the jejunum (the next part of the small intestine), the common bile duct, the gallbladder, and part of the stomach . A modification of the Whipple procedure (a pylorus-preserving Whipple procedure) has been developed that preserves the part of the stomach (the pylorus) that is important for stomach emptying .

  • In the past, complications and deaths following the Whipple procedure were high, and cure rates were less than 10 percent. However, more recent results suggest better outcomes:
  • In experienced hands, the death rate following Whipple surgery is less than 4 percent .
  • The long-term outlook for people undergoing this surgery varies, depending in part on whether the cancer has affected the lymph nodes. Between 10 and 30 percent of people who have a Whipple procedure for pancreatic cancer will be alive and cancer-free five years after the operation.

 

Better outcomes are possible in hospitals that perform a large number of  Whipple procedures and when the surgeon is experienced with the procedure.

 

Surgery for tumors in the body or tail of the pancreas — Because tumors in the body or tail of the pancreas do not cause the same symptoms as those in the head of the pancreas, these cancers tend to be discovered at a later stage, when they are more advanced.
If the tumor can be removed with surgery, a laparoscopy is usually done first to make sure the cancer has not spread. If surgery is an option, part of the pancreas is removed, usually along with the spleen.

Adjuvant therapy after surgery — Adjuvant (additional) therapy refers to chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of both that is recommended for people who are thought to be at high risk of having cancer reappear after a tumor has been removed surgically. Surgery for tumors in the head of the pancreas — The standard operation for tumors in the head of the pancreas  is a Whipple procedure (also called a pancreaticoduodenectomy) .
In this procedure, the surgeon removes the pancreatic head, the duodenum (first part of the small intestine), part of the jejunum (the next part of the small intestine), the common bile duct, the gallbladder, and part of the stomach . A modification of the Whipple procedure (a pylorus-preserving Whipple procedure) has been developed that preserves the part of the stomach (the pylorus) that is important for stomach emptying .
In the past, complications and deaths following the Whipple procedure were high, and cure rates were less than 10 percent. However, more recent results suggest better outcomes.

Chemoradiotherapy
According to Cancer Care Specialist Dr. Nav Sharda of Cancer Care and Treatment Center, Las Vegas, Chemoradiotherapy requires a central venous access catheter (often termed a port). This is placed during surgery into one of the large blood vessels in the chest. Chemoradiotherapy also requires a portable chemotherapy pump; this is a small, battery-operated pump that fits into a pack that can be worn around the waist. The pump gives the chemotherapy medicine into the port continuously for five to six weeks.

During this time, the patient is treated with radiation therapy five days per week. The radiation is delivered while the patient lies on a table underneath or in front of the machine. The treatment takes only a few seconds (similar to having an x-ray).

Compared to no therapy, chemoradiotherapy increases survival to approximately 10 to 13 months.

In some cases, the chemotherapy pump is not covered by health insurance. In this case, an oral (pill) form of chemotherapy can be substituted. This treatment is taken as a pill once per day, along with radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is given five days per week. This combination probably works as well as the chemotherapy pump plus radiation therapy, although studies have not been done.

 

Treating pancreatic cancer symptoms — Pancreatic cancer often causes bothersome symptoms like jaundice, blockage of the bowels, pain, and weight loss. Treatments are available to relieve these symptoms.

Jaundice — Jaundice is caused by a blockage of the flow of bile through the common bile duct into the intestine (figure 1). The most common treatment is a stent, which is a small tube that is inserted into a duct to keep it open. The stent can usually be placed in a procedure called ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography). More information on this procedure is available separately.

Bowel (duodenal) blockage — About 15 to 20 percent of people with pancreatic cancer will develop a blockage in the upper intestine (duodenum) caused by the tumor (figure 1). Surgery can be done to create a detour between the stomach and a lower part of the intestine. An alternative to bypass surgery is placement of a stent (a tube) in the duodenum. The stent helps to hold open the blocked area.

Pain — Pain is a common problem in people with pancreatic cancer. In some people, pain medicine alone is all that is needed. Radiation therapy can also help relieve pain by shrinking the tumor.
A new treatment called celiac plexus block might also be a good option to control pain. This procedure uses injections of alcohol into nerves that transmit pain signals. The alcohol kills the nerves, preventing them from telling the brain to feel pain.

Weight loss — Weight loss is common in people with pancreatic cancer. Taking a pancreatic enzyme replacement can help your body to absorb fat. Enzyme replacements are usually taken in a capsule on a daily basis.
If nausea and vomiting is a problem, there are several medicines that can reduce these symptoms and improve the appetite.

 

Cancer Care Centers is located in Las Vegas under the supervision of Cancer Specialist Dr. Nav (Navneet) Sharda. Cancer Care Centers specialize in treatment of various types of cancers like multiforme, meningioma, tonsil, tongue, laryngeal, parotid, neck, lung, breast, lymphoma, non hodgkins lymphoma, hodgkins disease, hodgkins lymphoma, skin cancer, melanoma, esophageal, gastric, pancreatic, colon, renal, kidney, ovarian, sarcoma, uterine cancer, cervical cancer, vaginal, brain, breast, vulvar cancer, bone metastasis, bone, osteosarcoma, endometrial cancercarcinoma, tumor, malignant and cancerous Cancers. We offer threapy like chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radiation therapy, radiation oncology, oncology, oncologist, immunotherapy, brachytherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, IMRT, intensity modulated radiation therapy, conformal therapy, anaplastic astrocytoma, gioblastoma.

39 responses to “What is Pancreatic Cancer?”

  1. canadian government approved pharmacies https://andere.strikingly.com/

    Fantastic knowledge. Kudos.

  2. buy cialis without a doctor’s prescription https://swerbus.webgarden.com/

    You have made your point.

  3. canada online pharmacies https://kevasw.webgarden.com/

    Truly loads of wonderful tips!

  4. cialis 20 mg best price https://62553dced4718.site123.me/

    You actually expressed this fantastically!

  5. buy generic cialis https://site128620615.fo.team/

    Thanks. Valuable stuff!

  6. cialis prices https://fwervs.gumroad.com/

    With thanks! Helpful information.

  7. cialis pills https://sehytv.wordpress.com/

    Information effectively taken!!

  8. online prescriptions without a doctor https://kerbgsw.mystrikingly.com/

    Great knowledge. Thank you.

  9. Cancer Care Center Las Vegas | What is Pancreatic Cancer?

    https://msg-consulting.ma/category/economics/

  10. Cancer Care Center Las Vegas | What is Pancreatic Cancer?

    https://javaeecourse.devbg.org/tag/css/

  11. eurocasino says:

    Cancer Care Center Las Vegas | What is Pancreatic Cancer?

    http://map.org.mk/index.php/mk/component/k2/item/1/1?start=95910

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.