What is Breast Cancer?
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What is Breast Cancer?

What is Breast Cancer?

This information is provided by Dr. Navneet Sharda as an educational source pertaining to Breast cancer. It is not intended as a substitute for a consultation with a qualified healthcare provider.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with breast cancer, it’s important to understand some basics: Dr. Navneet Sharda will answer – What is breast cancer and how does it happen?

Navneet Sharda, M.D a Las Vegas oncologist will discuss in this section how breast cancer develops, how many people get breast cancer, and what factors can increase risk for getting breast cancer. You also can learn more about signs and symptoms to watch for and how to manage any fears you may have about breast cancer

Breast cancer is an uncontrolled growth of breast cells. To better understand breast cancer, it helps to understand how any cancer can develop.

Cancer occurs as a result of mutations, or abnormal changes, in the genes responsible for regulating the growth of cells and keeping them healthy. The genes are in each cell’s nucleus, which acts as the “control room” of each cell. Normally, the cells in our bodies replace themselves through an orderly process of cell growth: healthy new cells take over as old ones die out. But over time, mutations can “turn on” certain genes and “turn off” others in a cell. That changed cell gains the ability to keep dividing without control or order, producing more cells just like it and forming a tumor.

Breast profile:

A Ducts
B Lobules
C Dilated section of duct to hold milk
D Nipple
E Fat
F Pectoralis major muscle
G Chest wall/rib cage

Enlargement

A Normal duct cells
B Basement membrane
C Lumen (center of duct)

A tumor can be benign (not dangerous to health) or malignant (has the potential to be dangerous). Benign tumors are not considered cancerous: their cells are close to normal in appearance, they grow slowly, and they do not invade nearby tissues or spread to other parts of the body. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Left unchecked, malignant cells eventually can spread beyond the original tumor to other parts of the body.

To schedule a consultation with Dr. Navneet Sharda call 702-547-2273 or click here.

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